6 Bizarre Architectural Destinations You Have to See in Brooklyn bizarre architecture in brooklyn

Not only is Brooklyn teeming with some of the best restaurants, parks, galleries, and shops around, but it’s also home to some of the most interesting buildings in the world.

By Diane Phan - Source: http://inhabitat.com
Photo © Courtesy of Inhabitat

Photo © Courtesy of Inhabitat

Many NYC tourists and Manhattanites give Brooklyn the cold shoulder, sticking to city life on the island. But spending some quality time just across the East River should be on everyone’s ‘To Do’ list. Not only is Brooklyn teeming with some of the best restaurants, parks, galleries, and shops around, but it’s also home to some of the most interesting buildings in the world. From a brownstone that hides a portal to the NYC underground to a Japanese Victorian-inspired home to the ruins of a Navy Yard hospital complex built in the early 1800s, keep reading to find out more about 6 of Brooklyn’s most exciting, extraordinary, and downright odd architectural destinations.

Photo © Courtesy of Inhabitat

Photo © Courtesy of Inhabitat

The Brooklyn Heights Brownstone Hiding a Secret Underground Portal

Brooklyn Heights is one of Brooklyn’s most coveted neighborhoods. Brimming with beautiful brownstones and tree-lined streets, and located just steps away from the waterfront, it’s no surprise that famed names like Girls star Lena Dunham and singer Bjork call this neighborhood home. But did you know hidden within all of this beauty lies a secret portal to the NYC underground? It’s not as cryptic as it sounds, but back in 1908 the MTA transformed what was an actual residential building into ventilation station to accommodate the air flow of a newly constructed subway tunnel. The three-story row house sited along Joralemon Street and can be identified with its blacked out windows and a massive steel lock holding its door shut. (Okay, it’s a little creepy). Find out more about this mysterious “house” here.

Photo © Courtesy of Inhabitat

Photo © Courtesy of Inhabitat

The Japanese-Inspired Victorian Home in South Prospect Park

It’s no secret that Japanese architecture informed the work of many of Modernism’s greatest. But this South Prospect Park home designed by John J. Petit back in 1902-03 really takes it to a whole new level. Also known as 131 Buckingham, the home was actually constructed as a marketing piece to draw buyers in to view other homes in South Prospect Park. The ploy worked well, and many came in from around Manhattan and across the country, scooping up surrounding properties. This particular home has switched hands several times over the last century, but finally found its last exchange in 1972 when a woman named Gloria Fischer and her husband purchased it for a mere $86,000 (the property is valued at more than $1M today). And if you think the outside is weird, trust us, the interior is just as eccentric. Fischer has filled the interior with treasures she’s collected from across the globe, and even right off the streets of New York! You can see more images of the interior here.

Read more at: http://inhabitat.com

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