6 Edible Plants You Can Forage for in New York City

It’s also important to note that foraging is an offense that can lead to tickets or even incarceration in some areas, so practice caution.

By Yuka Yoneda - Source: http://inhabitat.com
Photo © Shutterstock

Photo © Shutterstock

Garlic mustard, ramps and blackberries may sound like ingredients you’d spot on a menu at a chichi restaurant, but did you know that they can all be found growing in New York City parks? We recently caught up with foraging expert Steve “Wildman” Brill to learn about six delicious, edible plants, and where they can be found in the city. Read on to see them all!

IMPORTANT GROUND RULES BEFORE FORAGING:

Foraging is a fascinating and rewarding pastime, but it can also be deadly if the right precautions aren’t observed. Many edible plants also have poisonous lookalikes, so it is of the utmost importance that anything you plan to eat be identified with 100% certainty first. For more information on how to forage safely, reference Steve Brill’s book, “Identifying and Harvesting Edible and Medicinal Plants in Wild (and Not-So-Wild) Places” or download the Wild Edibles app to take along with you on your adventure.

It’s also important to note that foraging is an offense that can lead to tickets or even incarceration in some areas, so practice caution.

Photo © Shutterstock

Photo © Shutterstock

MUGWORT

Mugwort is an invasive plant from Asia that is noted for its bitter bite it can lend salads, meats and other dishes. “Mugwort grows in all the parks, along streets, and in the cracks of the sidewalk,” Wildman tells us. “It’s one of the most common wild plants in our region.” The plant can also be used medicinally as a remedy for menstrual cramps, a benefit that Wildman himself testifies to in his video about the plant.

Photo © Shutterstock

Photo © Shutterstock

GARLIC MUSTARD

Give your salads a garlicky kick with this fairly common plant that grows in nearly all NYC parks. Despite its nutritious leaves and savory aroma (which acts as a defense mechanism against insects), garlic mustard is actually an invasive plant that is the bane of many gardeners. According to Wildman, garlic mustard can be found in woodlands, disturbed habitats, parks, road and trail sides, edge habitats, and wetlands.

Garlic mustard’s horseradish-flavored roots can also be utilized the same way you use horseradish in the early spring, fall, and mild winters, and the seeds, which ripen in summer, make a superb hot spice that is excellent added to dips or spreads, or baked into breads. But Wildman does caution that people of certain religious faiths should be very careful when collecting them as they’re not supposed to spill their seeds!

Read the full article at: http://inhabitat.com

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