Art news

David Catá Embroiders Portraits of Loved Ones Into Palms of His Hands

Takes the phrase “suffering for your art” to a whole new level, doesn’t it?

By Jasmin Malik Chua - Source: http://www.ecouterre.com

Photo © David Catá

Photo © David Catá


Love is pain, and Spanish artist David Catá knows that feeling better than most. Not content to carry snapshots of his nearest and dearest around in his wallet, the 21-year-old has chosen to embroider their likenesses into the palms of his hands. Catá creates each portrait by gingerly piercing the top layer of his skin with a needle, then drawing a length of colored floss through to create a stitch. The entire process takes four hours to complete, after which Catá picks the threads from his hand to reveal the barest outline of each face—and surprisingly little blood. Others may wince at his technique, but Catá says the pain is only superficial and “no boundary.”

SKIN AS CANVAS

“Every person we meet marks us in some way. Their image projects onto us, reminding us where we come from,” says Catá, who has sewn the faces of his brother, Javier; his grandfather, Catá; his grandmother, Josefina; his father; his Aunt Fe, his girlfriend, Tamara; and his teacher, Ciuco, among others. By doing this, his body becomes an “autobiographical diary”; a veritable “who’s who” of his biggest influences. “Their lives have been interwoven with mine to build my history,” he adds.

“Every person we meet marks us in some way,” Catá says.

Catá has even stitched a self-portrait, which he has enlarged and superimposed over his own face to show the fidelity to detail. Most of his efforts are focused on capturing the eyes and mouth.

Takes the phrase “suffering for your art” to a whole new level, doesn’t it?

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