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Traditional Crafts Merge with Contemporary Design at the Triennale Design Museum During the Milan Furniture Fair

13 designers have deconstructed the traditional crafts of Hangzhou and applied those in contemporary design.

Story by Irene Vermeulen - Source: http://inhabitat.com/
Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Bamboo bubble sofa, made of 732 handwoven balls. This design is by Yu-Jui Chou and Su-Jen Su. Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Located in Milan’s beautiful Parco Sempione, the Triennale Design Museum is a peaceful place of respite from the hustle and bustle of the main grounds of the Salone del Mobile. This year, the museum invited several countries to exhibit their craft and designs, including creatives from China, Korea, Denmark and Belgium. See some highlights from the Treinnale after the break.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Rong in Chinese means melting and fusion. This notion is at the core of the ‘Handmade in Hangzhou’ exhibition. 13 designers have deconstructed the traditional crafts of Hangzhou and applied those in contemporary design. And since 2013 is the year of bamboo, all designers have worked with this material. Pinwu curated this exhibit and designed some of the pieces on show, like the Piao2 chair, made of paper and bamboo strips, and the Air chair, a lightweight woven bamboo structure.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

For this carpet and cushion, twisted bamboo fibers were used. Design by Nicole Goymann, seen at Handmade in Hangzhou.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Zang Xiaochuan made jewelry out of bamboo and combined it with ceramics. The very fine woven bamboo goes beautifully with the glossy white ceramic parts.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

In the Gu chair, made of bamboo pulp fibers, the ancient Chinese craft of papermaking is used. Design is by Pinwu.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Wang Shenghai created a pouf that is both sturdy and flexible. It’s a beautiful design that makes clever use of bamboo material.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

These bamboo leaves can be used to create a partition, or they can be used as a decorative object. Pinwu designed these modular pieces.

 

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

The Toolbox, Belgium Design and the Art of Making’ created this exhibition as a tribute to artist and designer Henry van de Velde (1863-1957). Both young designers and established brands showed their products. Here, Belgian curator Giovanna Massoni chose to show the maker processes as well as the final products at this exhibition.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

An office cabin made of cardboard and biodegradable fabric was designed by Alain Berteau and made by ABV. In this exhibition, both designer and manufacturer are given credit for their work.

 

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Opalis is an online marketplace for leftover stock and salvaged building materials.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

The Korean Craft and Design Foundation exhibited a selection of traditional techniques and materials. 16 designs were presented, each of those made by experienced craftsmen. Next to each product a film on the maker process was shown. The presentation of Korean crafts included lacquerware pots, colorful bed textiles, and a tree with handmade silk flowers.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Kim Yeon Jin and Kim Sam-sik created these minimal lamps out of mulberry paper after studying the traditional Korean craft of paper making.

 

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Here, a raw silk hanbok, Korea’s traditional costume, consisting of multiple layers of garments. Design by Suh Young-hee and made by a team of 3 craftsmen.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Moleskine collaborated with Japanese designers Setsu and Shinobu Ito to experiment with new materials. The project was initiated by Material Conexion.

Italian stone producer Grassi Pietre worked on new applications for texture in stone.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

The Taiwan Craft Research Institute presented a collection of contemporary chairs. Chair Flow is made of bamboo strips. Taiwanese designer Cheng-Tsung Feng and craft artist Kao-Ming Chen wanted to make use of the calm and natural nature of the bamboo material to make a chair for relaxation.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Here, a family of stools that fit inside eachother. The stools are made of driftwood and a intricately woven natural fiber. The design is by Yi-Cheng Tsai and Mao-Hui Chen.

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Photo © Irene Vermeulen for Inhabitat

Another piece of fine craftsmanship from Taiwan. The stool made of 3 single tubes of bamboo that are split at the top and woven to create the seat.

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