Art

“Let’s Play” with Oakoak

The moment Roddy Piper put on those thick, black, 80’s style glasses and saw propaganda hiding behind every street sign and advertisement a new style of art was born. This new style would affect the way we saw our everyday surroundings, they would be more than just their base parts. Some popular street artists like to make scathing critiques of society. Others choose to see the brighter side, and try to use street art as a tool for brightening peoples day, such as French artist Oakoak.

Interview by Drew Bateman - Drewbateman1000@gmail.com Art by Oakoak
Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Citizen Brooklyn: Describe your style
Simple; my goal is to play with the urban element in the city.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: What was your first piece of street art?
A stencil of Louise Brook’s face.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: Did you start out with street art?
Yes, I began with it. I think it helps me; I prefer the street as a canvas. For me it’s difficult to stand in front of a blank canvas and make something.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: Is your art ever considered vandalism?
Everyone can think differently; personally I don’t think it is. I try to make my art on and around public elements though and never on historic places or privately owned structures.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: What’s the best time of the day to work?
I prefer to work very early in the morning. The light is present but the people aren’t, unless they’re drunk.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: What tools do you usually use?
I like to use an array of tools. I like to use spray bomb a lot, but paper and glue is my favorite.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: How long does your art last? Is it removed frequently?
My art is very ephemeral, so not very long. A person removing it, though, just inspires me to continue making it.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: A lot of your art references pop culture from the 90’s. How does pop culture affect your art?
I think that the 90’s pop culture affects me more than it does my art. Without Calvin and Hobbes, both my art and I would be different.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: While a lot of street art tends to be critical and cynical of society, yours tends to be humorous and almost whimsical. Why?
I suppose it’s just my nature. I like to do funny art, little people, stuff like that. I don’t have the greatest drawing skills, so I like to use my imagination and humor.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: You say that you try to find imperfections in the walls or streets of a city; do you consider your art to be masking the imperfections, drawing them out, or showcasing their uniqueness?
I don’t try to mask the imperfections, I try to draw them out and just make something funny, if it does mask them though, all the better. My first and foremost goal is to play with the elements of my canvas.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: Any Influences?
I like artists who play with the city, such as Varini, SPY, Fra Biancoshock

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

CBK: Final Words?
Let’s play.

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

Photo © Oakoak

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