Art

The Force of Nature. With: @_URD_

We relate to the world through our own form. It’s the most straight forward language one can use, the curves and landscapes of our bodies.

images by _URD_ Interview by Teo J. Babini
© @_urd_

© @_urd_

There is juxtaposition between human and animal/nature in your work. What does this mean for you?
Firstly, I must explain the origin of the name of this account, Urd. She was one of three goddesses of destiny in the northern mythology, whom waved threads in which every mans fate was determined. I have a strong connection to both nature and the animal kingdom, from which I gather a great deal of energy and force. The way animals communicate is such a bliss, where one can step out of every preconceived notion you might have of yourself. Try lying when creating a leadership role with a horse. Impossible.
The force of nature is the purest, I find. And in old times, double so. When man weren’t cut off from their origin and could still pick up information from the soil, or let the trees sooth you. Paganism? Sure, in a scaled down modern kind of way.
There is magic there, half forgotten today.

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

The focus of most of your work is on the human body. What led to this fascination and how does it continue to inform your work?
The Urd-account is my playground and sketchbook. Many of the images here are used for paintings later on. I am a both classically, and contemporary trained artist, and have always been seduced by the human figure. Classical training in Florence deepened that fascination.
We relate to the world through our own form. It’s the most straight forward language one can use, the curves and landscapes of our bodies. I also find it endlessly beautiful, of course. Playing with light and dark and the sense of space creates a perception of the beholders own shape in relation to the actual space, and I can therefore more easily communicate my inner world to the spectator. It’s an incredibly nice place to be, and I seek to share it. I have actually mingled two paintings amongst the images here. Let’s see if you can tell which ones?

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

Two of your photos have the mouth of a woman obstructed by objects, another her entire body constricted in some kind of web. Is there an underlying statement here?
In the two photos you are referring to where the mouth is obstructed, yes. They are both pieces important to me. The one where she’s biting i bit of old glass regards handling personal trauma, pain and betrayal. The one where a bird flies out of her open mouth has to do with release, and to be able to visually see whats inside you.
I work with the pictures in a very direct and flowing kind of way, and often see the deeper connection afterwards. I find it to be the most satisfying way to create.
The one with the web constraining her, is a collaboration with @bastien_baltazar_bux and his edit of my original picture.

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

What techniques do you use in post-production to comprise your signature look?
I use artstudio, mextures and stackables apps. In my day job, a part from the art, I work as an experience designer. Mainly digitally and I find artstudio pleasurably alike Photoshop. In some pictures I work with plenty of layers, others just requires a atmosphere provided by textures.I tend to lower the saturation quite a lot, it calms the expression down and provides a time-less look and feel.

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

There is also this element of motion. How do you feel about the dichotomy of featuring movement in a still photograph?
I really appreciate this question. A lot of my painted works circles around movement. I am incredibly fascinated by time, and the slowing of time. As when something that has a real impact on you occurs, your mind splits that moment in hundreds of visually strong moments, like frames in a movie. Scents, the closing of an eye, the rustle of cloth, steam in the cold air.
Everything registered moving by the eye is also still images. I seek to collect the strongest ones.

See more work of _URD_ on Instagram

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

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© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

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© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

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© @_urd_

© @_urd_

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© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

© @_urd_

 

 

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