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Going Bananas with Stephan Brusche

While banana art has been all the rage for quite some time, artist Stephan Brusche’s Fruitdoodles and banana art have rekindled interest in oddly specific, yet fun area of food art.

Interview by Tiffany Credle – tiffany@citizenbrooklyn.com Art by Stephen Brusche
Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Citizen Brooklyn: What made you begin your career in art and how did you get started?

It all started a few years back when my wife pushed me to start using Instagram. I was at work and I just wanted to post something. But there wasn’t much to photograph. I then noticed my banana and I figured it would make a nice post if I just drew a little happy face on it. I took a ballpoint pen and just started drawing. I was pretty amazed how pleasant a banana peel is to draw on. So the next day I did it again, now a pissed-off face for the sake of balance. After that I tried to come up with new ideas for drawings while using the shape of the banana in all kinds of clever ways. Trying to keep pushing myself I eventually started to carve in the banana peel as well. This opened up a whole new door of possibilities which I haven’t yet exhausted yet.

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

CBK: How do you find inspiration for your Banana art?

Sometimes I can just look at a banana and see something in it. That happened with ‘The Kiss by Gustav Klimt’, I saw the two bananas and it reminded me of that painting. Other times I think of something that sounds funny, like Banana Del Rey and then try to make one. 

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche


CBK: Do you consume any of your food art after capturing them?

Yes I do actually. Unless I cut them up really bad and they start to get filthy brown real quick. But most of the time the banana is eaten by the time I post it on my Instagram.

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche


CBK: A lot of your work is very intricate, how long does it take you on average to create a food piece? 

Depends, but it ranges from 30 minutes to a hour. The drawing is usually done pretty quick. I can’t pencil it out and then ink it and erase the pencil. I’ll just draw it all in one take. The cutting of the banana peel doesn’t that much time either. But taking a nice picture with a cool background and light can take a while. And also the editing in different apps on my iPhone (mextures, vsco cam or snapseed) can take a lot of time.

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche


CBK: Can we expect any other food based photo series from you in the near future?

Well, not in the near future, but maybe vegetables? I’m sticking with fruits because I still have a lot of banana ideas I haven’t worked out yet. And someone is sending me few dragonfruit’s, so that will be pretty cool to work with.

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Photo © Stephan Brusche

Visit Stephan Brusche’s website: www.sb77.nl

Follow Stephan Brusche on Instagram: http://instagram.com/isteef

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