POV

Frat brothers rape 300% more. One in 5 women is sexually assaulted on campus. Should we ban frats?

While probably not all fraternities are hunting grounds for rapists and
not all men who join frats (or varsity sports teams) are predators, when so much sexual violence is centered around one area of campus life, something has to be done.

By Jessica Valenti
‘Reforming or preserving these organizations doesn’t make a lot of sense,’ says the author behind a landmark study of college life. Photograph: Glen Wilson/AP

‘Reforming or preserving these organizations doesn’t make a lot of sense,’ says the author behind a landmark study of college life. Photograph: Glen Wilson/AP

When I was at Tulane University, girls were warned about the “bad” fraternities: the ones that spiked the punch at parties with Everclear and maybe drugs, the kind of frats where girls got hurt. During my first week of class 18 years ago, rumours circulated about a girl on my floor who had been sexually assaulted by multiple men at a frat party. These issues were always discussed with a certain nonchalance – as if having at least one rapist around was an inevitable part of fraternity life.

Not much has changed.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee police are currently investigating a fraternity after several women were found labeled with red and black X’s on their hands after they had to be hospitalized with memory lapses from intoxication at a fraternity party. Last year, three sexual assaults were reported at one Texas fraternity – within just one month. At Georgia Tech, a frat brother sent around an email guide called “Luring your rapebait”. Wesleyan had a frat that was nicknamed the “Rape Factory”. In 2010, fraternity brothers at Yale University marched through campus yelling, “No means yes, yes means anal.”

Read more at: http://www.theguardian.com

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