POV

The Peculiar Reach of the Poet’s Mind.

here the world weeps for itself
and sons of men are always alone
in the absence of a saving Father
Lale Müldür

Story and Photos by Icarus Blake - icarus@citizenbrooklyn.com
Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Lale had a vision. She saw Jesus, Buddha, and Mohammed. Jesus had a twin brother. She can’t give me a reason for that. He was just there. I’m thinking that if it were true, it could explain a lot about the ubiquity of Jesus. She agrees and she says that she chose the Buddha. Lale says she had a bad fight with her husband once and she felt so bad that she had to take medication. It made her numb, almost paralyzed. We talk about depression, how you can control it with psycho-killers, but how they make your mind flat and distant. How the peaks of inspiration are almost a religious experience.

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

But the highs are sometimes so intense that you overflow into madness. And then the downs, as deep as the highs. She says she does not write. She is channeled. Now she jumps back on the couch and she said I scared her. Then she laughs with true content. Like a child meeting a mischievous friend. There is beauty all over this woman, and the charisma of a mind bound to perdition. I tell her, in America, there is a resurgence of poetry among young people.

-You are lying- She says in a deep low voice.

– Nobody cares about poetry any more –

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

She closes her eyes for a long minute. Asleep with her many gods. Now she is suddenly back and raves about music and the words. How music is organic to her poetry, especially in the endings. Translations are bad; they rip the music out of poems. I imagine her mind in rapid talk with the Buddha while a majestic orchestra plays in the background. Where is a joint when you need one? She offers us tea. She lives the room for some time. We are left with dolls, memories and hundreds of books. She is back with pills, she hates taking them. The limits of control. Her assistant brings the tea, he’s gentle and quiet.

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

She reads one of her poems, Tierra del Fuego, her voice disappears inside her. She talks about losing a child and how the pain in her belly stayed for months after. Like a ghost pain, similar to when you get amputated. The melancholia of lost love is in every breath she takes. And it weighs in the air like a patch of dark, grey fog. She looks up to an imaginary sky; I can see clouds in fast motion inside her pupils. Her heart is large and beats the sounds of the dark side of love. Now I am channeled by her. The might of her mind has taken over mine. Horror and joy flow holding hands. I ask for the bathroom. It’s a red lit affair with a smell of musk. I answer a call while I am peeing; somebody from New York talks rapidly in my ears about missing pages in our magazine. I’m back in the room and she is signing books with laughter. She touches my arm and takes my hands in hers. Her skin is warm and soft. So are her eyes while she says goodbye.

Istanbul is dark and cold. We drive off looking for the bright lights of the city center. We eat lamb and we drink Raki. We laugh at nothing and we are happy to be stupid. I step outside for a smoke. I can feel the words of Lale slowly exiting my mind.

 

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Photo © Icarus Blake

Lâle Müldür is a Turkish poet and writer, considered one of the most influential Turkish poets of the last several decades. After graduating from Robert College, Müldür went to Florence to study with a poetry scholarship. She returned to Turkey to study electronics and economics for one year each at Orta Doğu Teknik Üniversitesi in Ankara. After two years in Ankara, she went to the United Kingdom, where she received her Bachelor of Science in economics from the University of Manchester, and her Master of Science in the sociology of literature from Essex University. Müldür then married a Belgian painter named Patrick Claeys and lived in Brussels from 1983 to 1987. Müldür worked as a columnist for the Radikal newspaper for a time. In 2002, Müldür suffered a brain hemorrhage, but soon recovered. She currently lives in Istanbul.

Thanks to Ebru Ozaydin for putting us in contact with Lâle Müldür

 

2 Responses to “The Peculiar Reach of the Poet’s Mind.”

  1. gaya says:

    This woman is amazing !

  2. Derya says:

    I love her very much