POV

These are South Korean apartments, not prison cells

In big cities in Asia, space can come at a premium. Not every residence is a shoebox, but they do exist. And some of them are truly awful.

By Jesus Diaz - Source: http://kotaku.com
Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

There are three kinds of people in South Korea: those who make real money and live in real homes; those who make cents assembling your phones and share a room with six other people; and those lucky ones who make a few dollars and can afford these prison cells that they call “apartments.”

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

In big cities in Asia, space can come at a premium. Not every residence is a shoebox, but they do exist. And some of them are truly awful.

Tokyo, for example, has coffin apartments. China has “ant colonies.” And South Korea?

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

In the past, there have been teeny-tiny sleep and study spaces in South Korea for students called “goshiwon” (고시원).

As tipster Sang points out, they were originally designed for students who needed to get away from distractions and simply buckle down and study for college entrance exams, government job exams, and whatnot. The rooms are rented for between the equivalent of $300 to $400 a month.

However, according to Korean media reports, some of these living complexes are being rented out as actual apartments and are now being dubbed “goshitel,” with the “tel” referring to “hotel.”

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Fewer affordable apartments and residences in big Korean cities are to blame. Then, there are some who are renting these cramped spaces as they try to get back up on their feet.

Online in South Korea, people pointed out that sleeping right next to the toilet was hardly ideal, while in neighboring Japan, the rooms were being compared to prison cells.

Some goshiwon are larger and nicer looking, and they even have kitchenettes—like a proper studio apartment.

Below, you can see some of the cells, I mean rooms.

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

Courtesy of kotaku.com

You know, if you don’t want to leave home, but still need help concentrating, you can always get a study box.

Source: http://kotaku.com

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