Brooklyn is ready to allow chickens, if they’re quiet

One of the biggest concerns expressed by members of the Safety Committee, chaired by Councilman Tom Murphy, was roosters crowing in early morning hours and waking up neighbors who are used to their trusty alarm clocks. That, too, is being addressed in the ordinance.

Story by Mike Holan - Source: http://www.cleveland.com/

Photo ©Mark Holan

BROOKLYN — If everything goes as planned, council will pass an ordinance at its meeting Oct. 9 making it legal to raise chickens in Brooklyn.

Introduced by Councilwoman Colleen Coyne-Gallagher, the ordinance will allow residents to own up to six chickens on a standard residential lot of 4,800 square feet.

According to city officials, there are already a number of chicken coops with chickens in the city, but at this time they are illegal.

The ordinance will also place restrictions on the types of coops and the sizes of the enclosures allowed on a residential lot.

The following are just some of the regulations listed in the ordinance:

• No more than one chicken is allowed on a 800-square-foot lot.

• The coops or cages housing chickens may not be located in front yards or side street yards. No chickens may be kept in front yards or side yards.

• No roosters may be kept on a residential lot unless it’s at least one-acre and only if the coop is at least 100 feet from all property lines.

• Chickens must have access to an outdoor enclosure adequately fenced to prevent access by dogs and other predators. Each bird must have at least 10 square feet of area.

• Chickens may be slaughtered on-site only if they are consumed by the occupants of the house. No other animals may be slaughtered on-site.

One of the biggest concerns expressed by members of the Safety Committee, chaired by Councilman Tom Murphy, was roosters crowing in early morning hours and waking up neighbors who are used to their trusty alarm clocks. That, too, is being addressed in the ordinance.

It will be against the law for the chicken owners to have a rooster or chicken that makes noise “so as to habitually disturb the peace and quiet of any person in the vicinity of the premises.”

The chicken ordinance will be enforced by the city’s building department.

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