Art

Ethereal Intimacy

Most see posters and billboards on the street as advertising. Marco Rea sees them as a medium for his art. Haunting, beautiful, and disturbing—Rea is able to take everyday advertising and bend it to his will.

Interview by Helen Li - Helenli.0894@gmail.com Art by Marco Rea
Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

Citizen Brooklyn: Your work emits a hauntingly beautiful and ethereal distortion of the female form, particularly in your pieces that alter traditional billboards. In fact, much of your work deals with a female subject–why?

I find women a more interesting matter, from both an aesthetic and emotional point of view. I believe women are capable of stronger feelings, not only good but also bad: love, sadness, passion, pain, etc..
I love how women are catalysts of feelings.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: Is there a certain quality in an advertisement that you look for when choosing ones to use in your work?

To me art is a challenge. I love to alter and revolutionize something that already exists and turn it into something that wasn’t there before.
I use advertising posters and twist them up with spray cans. I prefer to use impersonal posters, the more meaningless they are, the more I am able to create something interesting out of it, giving it a complete new life.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: Could you describe your creative process when it comes to developing an idea and executing it?

The most important thing is instinct. I love to let myself go to it, no drafts, ever. I let my art be free and let the chance and instinct guiding me, like a kind of an artistic trance. When my work is done and I am finally standing in front of it, I feel astonished and touched.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: You have a background in graffiti that has become the basis for your work. Who are some street artists that you would like to be compared to?

When I was a kid, Futura2000 and Phase Two did a couple of graffiti pieces around the area where I used to live, I was so impressed by those that it inspired me to make my own ones. At the moment I love the works of Sten & Lex, 108, Vhils and the evolution of Graffuturism.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: At its worst, street art is considered vandalism. Have you ever spray painted over a public billboard?

I did paint on public walls, public transport and sometimes even over public billboards too…but I’d rather pick them up from the street and work on it in my studio.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: There is a disturbing quality about being able to take something that has been created for the purposes of being fed to the masses and distorting it to your will where the original message is lost. You seem to erase the consumerist qualities of advertisements. Is this a message in your work?

There’s no message in my work and I am not interested in giving any. I believe art goes beyond real life and beyond the need to give a meaning to everything… I use advertising posters because we are living in advertisements; I live in Rome and this city is filled with that, it was impossible for me to ignore it and it was almost spontaneous for me to use something that was right there, something that I was forced to stare at every single moment, something that I didn’t ask for, something that doesn’t belong to me and something that for these reasons I must use and abuse to make it mine.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: Being in Rome, do you ever feel that the preference for classical art and design places a damper on your inspiration when creating a piece?

Classical art is everywhere here in Rome but I’ve always been more interested in contemporary art. I find Van Gogh, Schiele, Bacon, Bellmer, Witkin and many more supreme. Although I must admit that for some works I got inspired by Caravaggio, perhaps it is impossible for a Roman to be aloof from classical art, it hunts you.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: You have mentioned that art is not happiness. How are your personal feelings incorporated into capturing the mental spaces and melancholy?

I believe that art, the pure one, comes from an internal necessity and damnation. Making art is like therapy. Any time I paint, my feelings get possessed by my work; kind of like a Dorian Gray picture that enchants my deepest and intimate emotions.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

CBK: Do you have plans of focusing on other subjects in the future?

I could never get tired of working on faces and human figures, therefor I’ll keep doing it. But I love so much to experiment with my technique and I always look for something every time more extreme to test with my spray cans. I think I created different techniques never used before.

I don’t know where the future will take me but of one thing I am sure, I’ll keep on experimenting.

Art ©  Marco Rea

Art © Marco Rea

Check out more of his work here:

Carbonmade: http://marcorea.carbonmade.com/
Facebook: www.facebook.com/marcorea.art
Tumblr: marcorea.tumblr.com
Email: arte-rea@libero.it

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